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This page will display all public deliverables approved by the European Commission.

SP1 - Infrastructure

D11.1 Design requirements and improved guidelines

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This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 1.1 under Sub-Project1 (SP1) of the Capacity4Rail (C4R) project. The aim of this deliverable is to identify the design requirements to develop new track concepts that address the general objectives of the project, i.e. an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway infrastructure. Those requirements comprise (...)

This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 1.1 under Sub-Project1 (SP1) of the Capacity4Rail (C4R) project.
The aim of this deliverable is to identify the design requirements to develop new track concepts that address the general objectives of the project, i.e. an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway infrastructure.
Those requirements comprise geometrical, mechanical, environmental, construction, maintenance, operational and safety features that the new track system should accomplish. When possible, the requirements have been differentiated between high-speed and mixed traffic, that are the two scenarios set out in the Description of Work.
The starting point for the developments are the current track systems, that are broadly described in this report, and the regulatory framework, in particular the Technical Specifications for Interoperability (TSI). This will ensure that the new systems are competitive against existing track concepts and will ease the homologation and market implementation in every Member State.
In order to feed the design with cutting-the-edge knowledge on railway infrastructure, three guidelines have been drafted: 1) Deeper knowledge on track actual loads; 2) Resilience to natural events; 3) Combined design to cost and RAMS methodologies. These reports, annexes to the deliverable, are able to be used by designers as stand-alone documents.

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D11.2 Design requirements concepts and prototype test results intermediate

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This report is the second deliverable for Work Package 1.1 under Sub-Project1 (SP1) of the Capacity4Rail (C4R) project. The aim of this deliverable is to present the 2 new slab track concepts that address the general objectives of the project, i.e. an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway infrastructure. These 2 concepts where designed in agreement with the (...)

This report is the second deliverable for Work Package 1.1 under Sub-Project1 (SP1) of the Capacity4Rail (C4R) project.
The aim of this deliverable is to present the 2 new slab track concepts that address the general objectives of the project, i.e. an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway infrastructure. These 2 concepts where designed in agreement with the requirements defined in D1.1.1 and they will be prototyped and tested in Task 1.1.3.
Firstly, the deliverable recaps the general requirements for designing an innovative slab track concept. These requirements are mainly based on the feedbacks from current operated slab track systems. A special attention is paid for construction costs and maintenance costs requirements in order to design a financially more attractive product.
Secondly, the generation of ideas using collaborative workshops and design thinking methodology is described. Then, selection and refinement of two most promising concepts is detailed.
Thirdly, planned construction procedure and maintenance procedure of the selected concepts are detailed.
Fourthly, prototyping and testing methodology of both concept at CEDEX TrackBox is presented. Fifthly, Life Cycle Cost and business model studies are shown.
Further design studies and feedbacks from prototyping and testing will be put into next deliverable, D1.1.3.

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D11.3 Design requirements concepts and prototype test results final

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This report is the third deliverable for Work Package 1.1 under Sub-Project1 (SP1) of the Capacity4Rail (C4R) project. The aim of this deliverable is to present the 2 new slab track concepts that address the general objectives of the project, i.e. an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway infrastructure. To that extent, the deliverable documents the structural (...)

This report is the third deliverable for Work Package 1.1 under Sub-Project1 (SP1) of the Capacity4Rail (C4R) project.
The aim of this deliverable is to present the 2 new slab track concepts that address the general objectives of the project, i.e. an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway infrastructure. To that extent, the deliverable documents the structural and functional design, describes the developed installation and maintenance procedures and presents the results of the studied business cases.
Additionally, as both concepts were prototyped, installed full-scale in the CEDEX railway section testing facilities and tested, the deliverable strives to describe the unexpected difficulties and conclusions related to the installation procedure extracted from the prototype construction, record the parameters and particularities of the tests performed on the prototypes and present the analysis of the data recovered during the testing.
In Section 3, the deliverable recaps the general requirements for designing an innovative slab track concept. These requirements are mainly based on the feedbacks from current operated slab track systems. A special attention is paid for construction costs and maintenance costs requirements in order to design a financially more attractive product.
Section 4 provides a detailed geometric description of both slab track concepts, as well as a general overview of the structural and functional design process, including the most relevant features of the FE models and a general approach to the results
Section 5 and 6 describe the component fabrication process, system installation procedure and foreseen maintenance operations
Sections 7 documents the installation, testing procedure and data analysis performed of the two concept prototypes
Sections 8 and 9 document the Life Cycle Cost and studied business cases and their most relevant conclusions.

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D11.4 Upgrading of infrastructure in order to meet new operation and market demands

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The objective of the current report is to facilitate upgrading in a methodical, (cost-) efficient and environmentally friendly way. To this end, the guideline will contain clear descriptions and recommendations. It can be considered as a combination of checklists, functional requirements and overviews of potential possibilities of analyses and actions. However, foremost it outlines a (...)

The objective of the current report is to facilitate upgrading in a methodical, (cost-) efficient
and environmentally friendly way. To this end, the guideline will contain clear descriptions
and recommendations. It can be considered as a combination of checklists, functional
requirements and overviews of potential possibilities of analyses and actions. However,
foremost it outlines a structured way of working with the upgrading process.

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D11.5 Upgrading of infrastructure in order to meet new operation and market demands final

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Upgrading of existing lines to enhanced freight capacity is one of the most important questions to promote railway freight and meet future demands from industry and society. The reason is that today very few railway lines worldwide are constructed specifically for freight traffic. The current trend is instead that new lines are constructed for high-speed operations, whereas remaining lines (...)

Upgrading of existing lines to enhanced freight capacity is one of the most important questions to promote railway freight and meet future demands from industry and society.
The reason is that today very few railway lines worldwide are constructed specifically for freight traffic. The current trend is instead that new lines are constructed for high-speed operations, whereas remaining lines are transformed towards more freight and regional traffic. These existing lines were however built for the traffic demands at the time of construction, which may be very different from the traffic situations for which they are to be used.
This means that lines need to be upgraded in order to meet the new demands from increased freight operations that often have a different character than the freight traffic that existed before the transition. In this context it should be noted that freight operators often propose enhanced operations (e.g. longer trains, increased axle loads, more frequent operations), which commonly are not realised due to infrastructure limitations. The way around this is to upgrade the lines. The experience from countries that have allowed enhanced operations through upgrading is that there are indeed limitations to what can be utilized, but also possibilities to overcome and/or circumvent these limitations. To achieve this, it is important that the upgrading is carried out in a systematic manner with a clear vision of the desired transport concept, and that state-of-the-art knowledge is employed.

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D12.1 Innovative designs and methods for vhst intermediate

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The main objectives of this deliverable are a) to analyse the impact of the pass-by of Very High Speed Trains (VHST) in the dynamic response of a railway ballasted track and b) to identify improvements that are necessary to implement in the railway track design to hold the circulation of VHST. To fulfill these objectives, the first task that was to select some of the tests performed in CEDEX (...)

The main objectives of this deliverable are a) to analyse the impact of the pass-by of Very High Speed Trains (VHST) in the dynamic response of a railway ballasted track and b) to identify improvements that are necessary to implement in the railway track design to hold the circulation of VHST.
To fulfill these objectives, the first task that was to select some of the tests performed in CEDEX Track Box (CTB) on ballasted tracks subjected to the pass-by of trains. The results obtained in those selected tests were used to calibrate and validate the numerical models developed by IST.
In this respect, Chapter 3 is devoted to describe the tests performed in CEDEX Track Box (CTB) in a 1:1 scale model of a ballasted track with granular subballast subjected to the pass-by of 1 M axle loads of a passenger train travelling at 300 km/h. This particular CTB section was considered along this subtask of the project, as the reference track case, taken as basis for further analysis and upgrade to be made. Appendix 8.1 collects a detailed description of the model tested, the instrumentation installed and the results obtained.
An intermediate task was the performance of two in-situ test campaigns in the Madrid-Barcelona High Speed Line to create a data base of the vibrations measured in a real track produced by passing-by of different trains travelling at high speeds (around 300 km/h) and to analyze the track dynamic behaviour. Chapter 4 collects all the information of these two campaigns while Appendix 8.2 shows all the results obtained.
The main core of the document is the performance of a set of numerical analysis by IST using a model validated with the CTB reference case to estimate track responses at vhs and to further apply parametric studies and optimization algorithms. The analysis made enabled to identify the potential dangers of the current railway track properties for vhs, upgrading its design. Furthermore, numerical simulations made allowed to determine the best combination of modifications, in terms of properties in the different elements of the railway section, to decrease the negative impacts of the vibrations produced by VHST.

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D12.2 Innovative designs and methods for VHST final

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This deliverable presents important aspects of railway bridge dynamics for very high speed lines, comprising analysis, modelling procedures and full scale testing. A state-of-the-art in the subject is also given focusing on the choice models, especially regarding boundary conditions, load distribution and soil-structure interaction. Parametric studies on common types of beam and portal (...)

This deliverable presents important aspects of railway bridge dynamics for very high speed lines,
comprising analysis, modelling procedures and full scale testing. A state-of-the-art in the subject is also
given focusing on the choice models, especially regarding boundary conditions, load distribution and
soil-structure interaction.
Parametric studies on common types of beam and portal frame bridges are presented for speeds up
to 480 km/h. The results show the importance of considering the effect of train-bridge interaction, the
effect of track irregularities and rail surface roughness. Possible solutions for vibrations reduction are
presented and discussed.
For verification, a full scale test on a portal frame bridge on Madrid-Lérida high-speed line is presented
and results are compared with theoretical models.
The analysis work and the writing of this document has been performed by KTH Royal Institute of
Technology in Sweden and Systra in France, as follows:
- KTH: Chapter 1 – Chapter 7, except Section 4.3
- Systra: Section 4.3 and Chapter 7
Appendix A is written by CEDEX and includes a description of the in-situ test campaign performed in
November 2015.

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D13.1 Operational failure modes of Switches and Crossings

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The density of Switches and crossings (S&C) in most railway networks is estimated to be 1 every km which equates to over 300,000 units within the networks of EU27 countries and the cost of maintenance of an S&C unit is believed to be equivalent to that for 0.3km of plain line track. Further costs are incurred at renewals which, even at very modest rates of renewal, mount up to a very (...)

The density of Switches and crossings (S&C) in most railway networks is estimated to be 1 every km which equates to over 300,000 units within the networks of EU27 countries and the cost of maintenance of an S&C unit is believed to be equivalent to that for 0.3km of plain line track. Further costs are incurred at renewals which, even at very modest rates of renewal, mount up to a very large figure. Thus the economic impact of S&C units on the maintenance and renewal budgets of railway authorities is very apparent. Hence any increase in the life span of this important infrastructure asset through better design or maintenance practices is considered highly desirable and is one of the primary objectives of this project.
The recently completed EU project, Innotrack, has emphasized the need to identify the major cost factors and use this knowledge as the drivers for essential improvements to design, installation, and maintenance practices. An understanding of the degradation mechanisms associated with S&C units is essential for the optimization of design and maintenance procedures to eliminate or minimize the impact of the causes of the life limiting degradation. This deliverable of a catalogue of defects that are encountered in S&C units is a contribution towards this objective.

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D13.2 Innovative concepts and designs for resilient S&Cs (intermediate)

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The turnout (Switch & Crossing, S&C) is a vital component in railway networks as it provides flexibility to traffic operation by allowing trains to switch between tracks. However, the flexibility comes at a cost as the variation and discontinuities in rail profiles in the switch and crossing panels result in increased dynamic loading during wheel passage and thus increased (...)

The turnout (Switch & Crossing, S&C) is a vital component in railway networks as it provides flexibility
to traffic operation by allowing trains to switch between tracks. However, the flexibility comes at a
cost as the variation and discontinuities in rail profiles in the switch and crossing panels result in
increased dynamic loading during wheel passage and thus increased degradation of track (and
vehicle) components compared to plain line track. Common damage mechanisms on rails are wear,
plastic deformation and rolling contact fatigue (RCF), while components suffer from fatigue (cracked
casting) and support degrades (uneven ballast settlement and voids). The present deliverable is an
intermediate report describing the work carried out in Capacity4Rail WP1.3, tasks 2, 3 and 4.

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D13.3 Innovative concepts and designs for resilient S&Cs (final)

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The main focus of the report is to investigate and propose innovative designs aiming towards improved S&Csthat reduces material deterioration and failures (task 1.3.2). Based on numerical simulations with validated models and software, the approach is focused on improved understanding of dynamic wheelrail interaction in S&C and on how the rail degradation can be reduced by (...)

The main focus of the report is to investigate and propose innovative designs aiming towards improved
S&Csthat reduces material deterioration and failures (task 1.3.2). Based on numerical simulations with
validated models and software, the approach is focused on improved understanding of dynamic wheelrail
interaction in S&C and on how the rail degradation can be reduced by optimisation of geometrical
and stiffness properties of the turnout. Examples of design variables are rail profiles and the selection
of dynamic stiffness for the resilient elements, such as rail pads, base plate pads and under sleeper
pads. The influence of rail grade selection and the introduction of friction management in the wheelrail
interface is also covered. The objective is to reduce rail degradation by improved wheel-rail contact
conditions leading to a reduction of wheel-rail contact forces (stresses) and creepages. Reduced rail
degradation rates will reduce the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) for turnouts. One particular challenge in the
optimisation of S&C is to reach a design that is robust in terms of allowing for large variations in traffic
conditions due to different vehicle types and worn wheel profiles.

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SP2 - New Concepts for Efficient Freight systems

D 21.1 - Requirements toward the freight system of 2030/2050 intermediate

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With WP2.1 “Progress beyond State of the Art on rail freight systems”, the Freight subproject is focusing on the general market trends through the description of today and future demand for rail freight by existing forecasts and describes scenarios for freight flows up to 2030/2050. It performs an analysis of existing and expected future customer requirements for different good segments and, (...)

With WP2.1 “Progress beyond State of the Art on rail freight systems”, the Freight subproject is focusing on the general market trends through the description of today and future demand for rail freight by existing forecasts and describes scenarios for freight flows up to 2030/2050. It performs an analysis of existing and expected future customer requirements for different good segments and, beyond state of the art, identifies the requirements for vehicles, intermodal systems and operation principles that remain to be successively bridged until 2030/2050. Its final objective is to specify the requirements of an efficient freight rail system which can fulfill the EU targets in 2030/2050.

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D21.2 Requirements toward the freight system of 2030-2050 (final)

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The total demand for freight in Europe has increased rapidly in recent decades, but rail freight has lost market share and most of the increase has been handled by trucks. In the last decade, rail markets share has increased in some countries because of deregulation, investments in rail and truck fees, but is still very low in many countries. In the new member states the markets have (...)

The total demand for freight in Europe has increased rapidly in recent decades, but rail freight has lost
market share and most of the increase has been handled by trucks. In the last decade, rail markets
share has increased in some countries because of deregulation, investments in rail and truck fees, but
is still very low in many countries. In the new member states the markets have decreased rapidly when
rail monopoly has been taken away.
Rail deregulation has not been implemented in practice in all countries while at the same time truck
deregulation has been implemented fully and resulted in a low-cost truck market. Moreover, the cost
of external effects has not yet been implemented.
Most forecasts show an increase of 60% in total freight demand by 2050 and an approximately
constant market share with a business-as-usual scenario. To fulfil the targets in the EU white paper, it
is necessary to roughly double rails’ market share from 18% in 2011 to at least 36% in 2050. This means
that the tonne-kilometres will be 3.6 times as much as today and 2.4 times as much as in a businessas-usual
scenario in 2050.
To reach the white paper target, it is necessary to both increase quality and capacity and lower the
cost of rail freight. The customers must be able to trust the delivery time to meet the requirements of
their logistic chain and the cost must be competitive with road freight. A system approach is therefore
needed and the critical development lines must be identified. From the customer’s transportation
needs that put demands on the wagons – the wagons are coupled together into trains where available
tractive power is taken into account – the train utilises the infrastructure with a certain performance
along a link and ultimately in a network from origin to destination.

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D22.1 - Novel Rail Freight Vehicle - intermediate

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WP22 is aiming to propose solutions to enhance the efficiency of Rail Freight transport. At the beginning a large forwarder operating long distance combined trains across Europe and a Car carrier operating a fleet of more than 3500 wagons involved in multimodal logistics across Europe and being also an ECM for other wagon operators have expressed their most urgent needs to increase their (...)

WP22 is aiming to propose solutions to enhance the efficiency of Rail Freight transport. At the beginning a large forwarder operating long distance combined trains across Europe and a Car carrier operating a fleet of more than 3500 wagons involved in multimodal logistics across Europe and being also an ECM for other wagon operators have expressed their most urgent needs to increase their efficiency by reducing their operating costs while improving the quality of service. The tools that this work package wanted to develop was to increase the usable length of a standard train with new wagon designs having a lower LCC. At thesame time improving the asset rotation with synchronous braking of all wagons could have reduced the wear and tear of the new composite brake blocks aiming at reducing noise.
Several designs have been studied for car carrier wagons reaching 5 bodies with 6 axels for an overall length of around 62m. For container traffics two ideas have been studied. The first one was to introduce in a standard train composed of wagons capable to carry 40’ containers or 40’ plus 20’ containers a partial flexibility to transport a third container type of 45’ without lengthening the trains and with minimal changes on the wagons. The second idea studied was a new design of a 5 bodies wagon with 6 bogies for an overall length of around 72m. This solution was aiming to reduce the number of bogies and hence the maintenance cost. A third idea was to develop the same concept for transport of crane-able semitrailers with a 4 bodies wagon with 6 bogies for an overall length of around 67M.
Each of these solutions were studied successfully in term of stability with the mathematical programs of KTH. The cost of these new designs were estimated by NTnetAB and the operational efficiencies calculated when possible or estimated according to expert experience. The impact in terms of temperature reduction with synchronous braking showed a significant decrease on the test benches of Knorr Bremse. Unfortunately new braking methodologies by applying successively strong braking followed by a release have reduced the temperature reached by the blocks and the wheel treads in a zone where the impact of the synchronous braking would not bring significant maintenance cost reduction and damage reduction.
For the new wagon designs the cost benefit analysis show interesting progress for the car carrier wagon and the container wagon but not for the pocket wagons. The flexibility of putting a third of the number of container with a length of 45’ without lengthening the train may be very promising. Finally an extremely promising field is to significantly reduce the preparation time before the departure of the train with the introduction of an EOT (End of Train) device. This intermediate deliverable will be completed in the next issue with the introduction of these new designs on the Network and with a possible roadmap to mobilize investors to create these new wagons.

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D22.2 Novel rail freight vehicles (final)

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WP22 is aiming to propose solutions to enhance the efficiency of Rail Freight transport. At the beginning a large forwarder operating long distance combined trains across Europe and a Car carrier operating a fleet of more than 3500 wagons involved in multimodal logistics across Europe and being also an ECM for other wagon operators have expressed their most urgent needs to increase their (...)

WP22 is aiming to propose solutions to enhance the efficiency of Rail Freight transport. At the beginning a large forwarder operating long distance combined trains across Europe and a Car carrier operating a fleet of more than 3500 wagons involved in multimodal logistics across Europe and being also an ECM for other wagon operators have expressed their most urgent needs to increase their
efficiency by reducing their operating costs while improving the quality of service. The tools that this work package wanted to develop was to increase the usable length of a standard train with new wagon designs having a lower LCC. At the same time improving the asset rotation with synchronous braking of all wagons could have reduced the wear and tear of the new composite brake blocks aiming at
reducing noise. Several designs have been studied for car carrier wagons reaching 5 bodies with 6 axels for an overall length of around 62m. For container traffics two ideas have been studied. The first one was to introduce in a standard train composed of wagons capable to carry 40’ containers or 40’ plus 20’ containers a partial flexibility to transport a third of the containers of 45’ without lengthening the
trains and with minimal changes on the wagons. The second idea studied was a new design of a 5 bodies wagon with 6 bogies for an overall length of around 72m. This solution was aiming to reduce the number of bogies and hence the maintenance cost. The third idea was to develop the same concept for transport of craneable semitrailers with a 4 bodies wagon with 6 bogies for an overall length of
around 67M. Each of these solutions were studied successfully in term of stability with the mathematical programs of KTH...

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D23.1 - Co-modal Transshipments and Terminals (intermediate)

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This Deliverable is basing on the general aims of CAPACITY4RAIL (C4R): to pave the way for the future railway system, delivering coherent, demonstrated, innovative and sustainable solutions. The deliverable objective is the conceptual design of transhipment technologies and Interchanges of the future 2030 and 2050 (rail yards, intermodal terminals, shunting facilities, rail-sea ports, etc.), (...)

This Deliverable is basing on the general aims of CAPACITY4RAIL (C4R): to pave the way for the future railway system, delivering coherent, demonstrated, innovative and sustainable solutions.
The deliverable objective is the conceptual design of transhipment technologies and Interchanges of the future 2030 and 2050 (rail yards, intermodal terminals, shunting facilities, rail-sea ports, etc.), according to their role in co-modal transhipment to influence freight demand distribution, both by operation improvements and logistic advantages.
Indeed, European rail freight has not progressed in parallel with the European economy: during the last century, the single wagon was the core business of railways; today, in contrast to the decline of conventional rail freight, combined transport has shown signs of growth.
Currently, rail freight transport consists of two main typologies: conventional rail freight services (wagonload) and combined transport services, which include the notion of transhipment and the flow of goods from an origin to an intermediate destination, and from there to another destination.
Terminals are a key element of transport services and, in this study, the main goal has been to suggest suitable methods to evaluate the performance of different types of rail freight terminals, which are applicable to various families of terminals:
-  Rail to road for long distance and shorter range units transfer;
-  Rail to rail for shunting and/or gauge interchange;
-  Rail to waterways (sea and inland).
To evaluate the performance of the typologies of terminals listed above and the influence of innovative operational measures and new technologies on their operation, we have chosen to use both analytical methods based on sequential application of algorithms (e.g. from queuing theory) and discrete event simulation models.
These methods and models have been tested on different terminals for the three typical case studies (Road-Rail, Sea-Rail, and Rail-Rail), evaluating both the global performance of the terminal and the performance of its components.
The first case study selected for the pilot application of methods and models and the evaluation of future scenarios is the terminal located in Munich Riem, operated by the DB owned company DUSS.
The set of road-rail terminals considered as case studies includes three intermodal terminals located in Antwerp: Combinant, Hupac and Zomerweg.
The Port of Valencia’s Principe Felipe Railway Terminal has been the selected as a case study for searail terminals.
Finally, Hallsberg case study deals with the largest marshalling yard in Sweden, both in the number of wagons handled and surface extension.
To evaluate the impact of the technological and management innovations introduced, the selected methods and models calculated corresponding Key Performances Indicators (KPI) for each of the scenarios.
The calculation of KPIs uses both analytical methods and the simulation models, compared with real world data, the case studies, allowing an estimation of the achievable level of accuracy.
Moreover, two logistic chains have been analysed, to identify the main measurable elements potentially affecting the operational and management phases, as well as the typical distribution of costs, distance and time and the distribution between rail, road and transhipment for case studies 1 and 2.
It emerged that novel technologies such as Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systems and Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) are useful for freight management in an intermodal transport chain.
Based on the innovative operational measures and technologies considered in WP2.1 and WP2.2, the scenarios for the case studies to be analyzed include a combination of elements. The analysis use the selected methods and models, taking into account their progressive temporal implementation.
The application of the selected analytical methods and simulation models has provided results illustrated in histograms for the most reliable results of a selection of KPI.
The implementation of new technologies and operational measures lead to a general increase of the key performance indicators and, consequently, an increase of terminal performance.

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D23.2 Co-modal transshipments and terminals (final)

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This Deliverable is based on the general aims of CAPACITY4RAIL (C4R): to pave the way for the future railway system, delivering coherent, demonstrated, innovative and sustainable solutions. The deliverable objective is the conceptual design of transhipment technologies and Interchanges of the future 2030 and 2050 (rail yards, intermodal terminals, shunting facilities, rail-sea ports, (...)

This Deliverable is based on the general aims of CAPACITY4RAIL (C4R): to pave the way for the future
railway system, delivering coherent, demonstrated, innovative and sustainable solutions.
The deliverable objective is the conceptual design of transhipment technologies and Interchanges of
the future 2030 and 2050 (rail yards, intermodal terminals, shunting facilities, rail-sea ports, etc.),
according to their role in co-modal transhipment to influence freight demand distribution, both by
operation improvements and logistic advantages

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D24.1 Catalogue rail freight system of the future (intermediate)

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The EU Transport White Paper 2011 set an ambitious vision of achieving a long-term competitive and sustainable transport system with the following goals: 30% of road freight over 300 km should shift to other modes such as rail or waterborne transport by 2030, and more than 50% by 2050, facilitated by efficient, green freight corridors. By 2050, a European high-speed rail network should (...)

The EU Transport White Paper 2011 set an ambitious vision of achieving a long-term competitive and
sustainable transport system with the following goals:
- 30% of road freight over 300 km should shift to other modes such as rail or waterborne
transport by 2030, and more than 50% by 2050, facilitated by efficient, green freight
corridors.
- By 2050, a European high-speed rail network should be completed. Triple the length of the
existing high-speed rail network by 2030 and maintain a dense railway network in all
Member States. By 2050, the majority of medium-distance passenger transport should go by
rail.
Keeping these goals in mind, in this research, C4R attempts to report a comprehensive and
integrated rail freight system consisting of, among others, four key areas: network, vehicle, terminal
and technical and operational aspects. C4R aimed to study and design new concepts for a modern,
fully integrated rail freight system, which meets the requirements of 2030/2050. C4R foresees the
following changes necessary to achieve the above mentioned EC goals.

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D24.2 Catalogue rail freight systems of the future (final)

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An important target in EU white paper at 2011 was to shift from road freight to rail or waterborne on longer distances. The actual development is not at the moment in line with this. To reach the white paper target, it is necessary to both increase quality and capacity and lower the cost of rail freight. In this report, guidelines and technologies would be proposed for 2030/2050. To (...)

An important target in EU white paper at 2011 was to shift from road freight to rail or waterborne on
longer distances. The actual development is not at the moment in line with this. To reach the white
paper target, it is necessary to both increase quality and capacity and lower the cost of rail freight. In
this report, guidelines and technologies would be proposed for 2030/2050.
To achieve this, SP2: New Concepts for Freight, was split into four work packages; WP21 Progress
beyond the state of the art, WP22; Novel rail freight vehicles and WP23; Co-modal transhipment and
interchange/logistics, culminating in WP24; Catalogue of specifications.
This document addresses the following objectives of WP24:
• To analyse the potential of newly designed, fully integrated rail freight systems and understand
the expected market up take levels;
• To produce a catalogue on rail freight systems to contribute to the Commission’s goals for 2030
and 2050 (i.e. achieving modal shift from road to rail) ;

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D24.3 Standards

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The objective of this deliverable is to capitalize on the research made for the new vehicles in WP22 and for the terminals in WP23 and to suggest standards for 2030-2050. After reviewing the proposed standards either in force on European Corridors or developed during past European projects, the deliverable recalls the main KPIs taken into account by the decision makers. These include; cost (...)

The objective of this deliverable is to capitalize on the research made for the new vehicles in WP22 and for the terminals in WP23 and to suggest standards for 2030-2050.
After reviewing the proposed standards either in force on European Corridors or developed during past European projects, the deliverable recalls the main KPIs taken into account by the decision makers. These include; cost of the service, reliability, interoperability, the capacity to cope with traffic variations and the capacity to provide updated information on the cargo and train status and position
and on its estimated arrival time at transfer points or final terminals.
Employing these decision criteria, the new wagon designs, new train length, new gauge, the gradients, the curves, the energy availability, new train operation and the new train management will be studied and their impact on the TSIs analyzed. A review of the main points of the infrastructure and rolling stock TSIs that might be impacted has been undertaken...

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D24.4 Final technical report of SP2 freight

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This deliverable produces the Final Technical Report of SP2 Freight. It synthesises and consolidates all the findings, conceptual designs, technical and operational developments produced so far, as a result of our collaborative work under SP2.
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SP3 - Operations for enhanced capacity

D31.1 Review of existing practices to improve capacity on the European rail network

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Task 3.1.1 of the Capacity4Rail project aims to “understand current practices to improve capacity across Europe” and to “identify the interim steps to achieve the future adaptable, resilient, automated transport network”. This deliverable is related to the work in Task 5.1.1, which aims to “draw the current situation in infrastructure/freight/operation/health monitoring and identify future (...)

Task 3.1.1 of the Capacity4Rail project aims to “understand current practices to improve capacity
across Europe” and to “identify the interim steps to achieve the future adaptable, resilient,
automated transport network”.
This deliverable is related to the work in Task 5.1.1, which aims to “draw the current situation in
infrastructure/freight/operation/health monitoring and identify future requirements, technologies
and visions for improvements”. It was intended that this report would build on the deliverables of
Task 5.3.1, which aims “to develop and verify steps to migrate from the existing system to the future
one” (D5.3.1 and D5.3.2, both yet to be delivered).

See the document
D31.2 Illustration of the application of capability trade-off

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This report describes the set-up, structure and functionalities of the on-line, web-based CTA tool. The use and application of the tool is demonstrated through a case-study consisting of the assessment of three investment options to increase capacity on the East Coast Main Line in the United Kingdom between Doncaster and Peterborough. The case study provides the results in terms of the (...)

This report describes the set-up, structure and functionalities of the on-line, web-based CTA tool. The use and application of the tool is demonstrated through a case-study consisting of the assessment of three investment options to increase capacity on the East Coast Main Line in the United Kingdom between Doncaster and Peterborough. The case study provides the results in terms of the impacts on C4R’s high level goals of Capacity, Affordability, Adaptability, Resilience and Automation when considering (i) upgraded rolling stock, (ii) upgraded rolling stock and removal of freight from the line and (iii) upgraded rolling stock, removal of freight and implementation of ETCS level 2 with optimised block lengths.

See the document
D32.1 Evaluation measures and selected scenarios

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The purpose of SP3 of the Capacity 4 Rail project is to increase capacity by better methods for timetable planning and operational traffic and to analyse and evaluate capacity of infrastructure and new traffic systems. We have identified four planning horizons, which are strategic level (building of infrastructure), tactical level (timetabling), operational level (shortterm rescheduling and (...)

The purpose of SP3 of the Capacity 4 Rail project is to increase capacity by better methods for timetable planning and operational traffic and to analyse and evaluate capacity of infrastructure and new traffic systems. We have identified four planning horizons, which are strategic level (building of infrastructure), tactical level (timetabling), operational level (shortterm rescheduling and dispatching) and driver advisory system (real-time). This deliverable analyses the existing methods for the tactical and operational levels from the aspect of their application for the enhancement of capacity utilisation. Improved methods in analytic, simulation and optimisation models for operational traffic control will raise either capacity utilisation (number of trains) or the punctuality.
Operational control of railway traffic is recognised as the critical point in railway systems that requires an improvement. The application of novel computer-based decision support systems is recognised as a potential approach. The discrepancy between the current state of the existing tools for real-time traffic control and the practical operational requirements is identified as the main gap. The focus of the future work will therefore be in overcoming the obstacles that are preventing a straightforward application of the laboratory tools in a realworld environment.
A set of potential scenarios that are required to validate the approaches is presented. The scenarios comprise the potential environments where the enhanced models could be applied. Different perspectives for defining the scenarios are considered. The scope and size, traffic heterogeneity, signalling system, the current level of traffic control and the availability of data are recognised as the crucial criteria for defining the scenarios. Finally, the Swedish southern mainline is recognised as the potential scenario that could be an appropriate instance for validation and evaluation of the models.
Next steps are: Task 3.2.4 Enhancing frameworks for simulations and modelling and Task 3.2.5 Initial evaluation of scenarios.

See the document
D32.2 Capacity impacts of innovations

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Deliverable D32.2 “Capacity impacts of innovations” summarizes the results of the Capacity 4 Rail work package WP3.2 “Simulation and models to evaluate enhanced capacity (infrastructure and operation)”. Capacity in the railway system can be divided in strategic level (planning of infrastructure), tactical level (timetabling) and operational level (dispatching). Closely related to the operational (...)

Deliverable D32.2 “Capacity impacts of innovations” summarizes the results of the Capacity 4 Rail work package WP3.2 “Simulation and models to evaluate enhanced capacity (infrastructure and operation)”. Capacity in the railway system can be divided in strategic level (planning of infrastructure), tactical level (timetabling) and operational level (dispatching). Closely related to the operational planning are Driver Advisory Systems (DAS), which in the future may be extended towards fully automatized driving.

See the document
D33.1 – Analysis of European best practices and levels of automation for traffic management under large disruptions

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Deliverable D32.2 “Capacity impacts of innovations” summarizes the results of the Capacity 4 Rail work package WP3.2 “Simulation and models to evaluate enhanced capacity (infrastructure and operation)”. Capacity in the railway system can be divided in strategic level (planning of infrastructure), tactical level (timetabling) and operational level (dispatching). Closely related to the (...)

Deliverable D32.2 “Capacity impacts of innovations” summarizes the results of the Capacity 4 Rail work package
WP3.2 “Simulation and models to evaluate enhanced capacity (infrastructure and operation)”. Capacity in the
railway system can be divided in strategic level (planning of infrastructure), tactical level (timetabling) and
operational level (dispatching). Closely related to the operational planning are Driver Advisory Systems (DAS),
which in the future may be extended towards fully automatized driving.

See the document
D33.2 – Recommendations for a European standard for traffic management under large disruptions

- PDF - 4.2 Mb

The objectives of this deliverable are: • The development of a set of recommendations for the management of large disruptions including extreme weather events; • The definition of a roadmap for automation strategies of European disruption handling processes; • The identification of the effect of different automation levels on disruption management as obtained from experiments and/or (...)

The objectives of this deliverable are:
• The development of a set of recommendations for the management of large disruptions
including extreme weather events;
• The definition of a roadmap for automation strategies of European disruption handling
processes;
• The identification of the effect of different automation levels on disruption management as
obtained from experiments and/or simulations.

See the document
D34.1 Data notation and modelling

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Deliverable 3.4.1 of the CAPACITY4RAIL project focuses on data formats and models for data exchange used in the railway sector with considerations of approaches in other transport modes. The focus is on open data formats that have the potential to substitute proprietary data formats in the future. It analysis three usage scenarios, where data exchange is and will be important to guarantee (...)

Deliverable 3.4.1 of the CAPACITY4RAIL project focuses on data formats and models for data exchange used in the railway sector with considerations of approaches in other transport modes. The focus is on open data formats that have the potential to substitute proprietary data formats in the future. It analysis three usage scenarios, where data exchange is and will be important to guarantee effective usage of railway capacity:

  • Consistent cross industry infrastructure data;
  • Effective usage of multimodal transport systems;
  • Real-time operations across organisational and member state borders.

For each use case, visions for 2020, 2030 and 2050 are outlined, the feasibility of relevant data formats, models and concepts are presented, and current gaps are demonstrated.

The deliverable concludes by making some recommendations on priority areas for data
modelling work in the CAPACITY4RAIL project:

  • Interaction of IM asset data sets with OpenStreetMap data in a round-trip process;
  • Upgrade of ON-TIME RTTP regarding railML 3 / UIC-RailTopoModel, and proposing it to the railML community;
  • Incorporate the consolidated findings of SP4 on sensor data into the upgraded RTTP;
  • Comparison of Schematron- and Ontology-based approaches for railway data verification;
  • Development of ontologies supporting Linked open data from specific formats such
    as railML and NeTEx;
  • Demonstrating the developed ontologies in typical use cases, oriented at the stories
    of this document.
    The question on how the data sets in the proposed data formats and models shall interact in order to enable scenario-oriented software solutions, will be answered in the deliverable D3.4.2 in form of architecture recommendations.
See the document
D34.2 – Verified data architecture

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Deliverable D3.4.2 of the C4R project complements the work done in D3.4.1 by looking at the ICT architectures and data resources the industry may choose to draw on in the short to medium term. Section 2 of the document presents a candidate software architecture for future TMS platforms, the Enterprise Service Bus. The ESB is becoming the architecture of choice within the software engineering (...)

Deliverable D3.4.2 of the C4R project complements the work done in D3.4.1 by looking at the ICT architectures and data resources the industry may choose to draw on in the short to medium term.
Section 2 of the document presents a candidate software architecture for future TMS platforms, the Enterprise Service Bus. The ESB is becoming the architecture of choice within the software engineering community, and has already been proposed for use in the rail sector by previous projects including InteGRail and ON-TIME.
Section 3 of the document focusses on semantic models for data integration, and the associated supporting architectures. It presents the potential costs and benefits of the semantic approach to data integration, and discussed some of the limitations including the scalability of the models, the challenge of distributing the reasoning architecture, and version management.
Section 4 shows how data external to the railways can be used to support railway operations through
the provision of enhanced situational awareness. It showed how geotagged data can be harvested from social media platforms, assigned to train services, and presented to control room staff based on an analysis of the sentiment contained in the message. It also discusses some of the issues of the use of social data in a railway context, including the need to ensure user privacy, and issues of the
trustworthiness of the data, particularly if that data is being used as the basis for decision making.

See the document

SP4 - Advanced monitoring

D41.1 – Critical components and systems ─ current and future monitoring

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This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 4.1 of sub-project 4 (SP4) of the Capacity4Rail project. The task 4.1.1 of WP4.1 aims to identify components and systems critical for operation/deterioration of the railway infrastructure that should be monitored as well as to identify the current and future monitoring possibilities. The identification of the key operational parameters (...)

This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 4.1 of sub-project 4 (SP4) of the Capacity4Rail project. The
task 4.1.1 of WP4.1 aims to identify components and systems critical for operation/deterioration of the railway
infrastructure that should be monitored as well as to identify the current and future monitoring possibilities.
The identification of the key operational parameters that govern deterioration of selected key
components/systems and the translation of measured data to deterioration predictions for these collection
strategies will be addressed in Task 4.1.2 and the related deliverable D4.1.2.

See the document
D41.2 – Monitoring-based Deterioration Prediction

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This report sets out from the state-of-the-art charting of current railway monitoring practices presented in Deliverable D4.1.1– “Critical components and systems ─ current and future monitoring”. In the current report, existing maintenance practices are contrasted to which the key parameters are that affect safety, reliability, efficiency and environmental impact in different parts of the (...)

This report sets out from the state-of-the-art charting of current railway monitoring practices
presented in Deliverable D4.1.1– “Critical components and systems ─ current and future monitoring”.
In the current report, existing maintenance practices are contrasted to which the key parameters are
that affect safety, reliability, efficiency and environmental impact in different parts of the railway
system. These parameters that govern the performance of a railway are then investigated in terms of
whether monitoring exists or is even possible. In cases where direct monitoring is not realistic,
possibilities for indirect monitoring are explored.

See the document
D41.3 – Strategies for data collection and analysis

- PDF - 2 Mb

This report sets out from the state-of-the-art charting of current railway monitoring practices presented in Capacity4Rail Deliverable D4.1.1: “Critical components and systems ─ current and future monitoring”, and in Capacity4Rail Deliverable D4.1.2: “Monitoring-based deterioration prediction”.
See the document
D42.1 Requirements for next generation monitoring and inspection

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This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 4.2 under Sub- Project 4 (SP4) of the Capacity4Rail project. The aim of this deliverable is to set out the basis for the selection of the most suitable components of the monitoring system, such as devices, methods and tools, to be integrated in upgraded and new infrastructure elements leading to the achievement of the general goals of (...)

This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 4.2 under Sub- Project 4 (SP4) of the
Capacity4Rail project.
The aim of this deliverable is to set out the basis for the selection of the most suitable components of the monitoring system, such as devices, methods and tools, to be integrated in upgraded and new infrastructure elements leading to the achievement of the general goals of the Capacity4Rail project, i.e. the design and development of an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway system.
First of all, a set of functional and technical requirements at low level, mid level and high level has been defined. Once scored, the features of the monitoring components can be assessed together with their cost in an evaluation framework (spreadsheet) developed to this end, giving the best value to the solution that better meets the functional and technical
requirements at minimum cost.
This methodology will be helpful in the work to be done in Tasks 4.2.2 and 4.2.3, in charge of the selection of sensor, energy harvesting, communication and data integration technologies.

See the document
D42.2 – Recommendations and guidelines for next generation monitoring and inspection

- PDF - 4.9 Mb

In this report, a wide range of sensors are considered, and examples of laboratory and field based evaluations are provided. Technologies are first identified and screened using a technology marketplace / identification framework, before being evaluated for use within the railway industry.
See the document
D42.3 – Report on demonstration of innovative monitoring concepts

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This deliverable focuses on a demonstration of an innovative monitoring system that is designed based on the research described in previous deliverable in work package 4.2. Key elements such as sensing, power, and communications technologies are included. It has also considered processing architectures, algorithms, and the final (...)

This deliverable focuses on a demonstration of an innovative monitoring system that is designed based
on the research described in previous deliverable in work package 4.2. Key elements such as sensing,
power, and communications technologies are included. It has also considered processing
architectures, algorithms, and the final integration.

See the document
D43.1 – Guidelines for installation and maintenance of sensors in new infrastructure

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The aim of this deliverable is to design a monitoring system to be easily integrated into the new infrastructure concepts developed in SP1, i.e. a modular slab track, and to compile the information required to assess the structural condition of these assets.
See the document
D43.2 – Demonstration of new monitoring techniques

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The aim of this deliverable is to describe the specific design, installation process, testing protocol and test results from the monitoring system devised in previous tasks (and described in D4.3.1). Said system has been installed in the demonstrators for the new infrastructure concepts developed in SP1, which shall also be thoroughly described in the (...)
See the document
D44.2 Marketable Retro-fit kits for selected applications

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This Deliverable presents the demonstration of retro-fit kits for existing structures, in order to monitor the risk of track buckling on a railway bridge, the structural health of a long span railway bridge and the track condition at a railway transition zone. It starts to describe the kits design, development and the field installation zones and it finishesshowing some data results (...)

This Deliverable presents the demonstration of retro-fit kits for existing structures, in order to
monitor the risk of track buckling on a railway bridge, the structural health of a long span railway bridge and the track condition at a railway transition zone.
It starts to describe the kits design, development and the field installation zones and it finishesshowing
some data results acquired from the monitoring systems installed.
The retro-fit kits are based on energy harvesting technologies, wireless power transmission, lowcurrent sensors, low-current measuring and data processing electronics and low-current and wireless data transmission. Two monitoring systems were devised for study the three case studies.

See the document
D44.3 Recommendation for an Open-Source and Open-Interface for railway advanced monitoring applications

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This Deliverable D4.4.3 presents a representative selection of Open-Source and Open-Interfaces which can be used as software components in a monitoring system.
See the document

SP5 - System assessment and migration to 2030/2050

d51.2 Interim milestones to achieve step-changes in Railway capacity and performance for passengers and freight

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The aim of this deliverable is to point out interim milestones that are necessary to achieve step changes in railway capacity and performance for passengers and freight. The report will summarize the results that were achieved in the project. It will try to answer “What will an adaptable, automated, resilient and high-capacity railway look like and how to pave the (...)

The aim of this deliverable is to point out interim milestones that are necessary to achieve step changes
in railway capacity and performance for passengers and freight.
The report will summarize the results that were achieved in the project. It will try to answer “What will
an adaptable, automated, resilient and high-capacity railway look like and how to pave the way?”

See the document
D52.1 Compendium and evaluation of RAMS, LCC and migration tools, and methods and sources of data

- PDF - 2.1 Mb

The aim of this document is to provide background on the current technology assessment methodologies and tools used in other rail related EU framework projects and by the wider industry. It matches these existing assessment methodologies to the Capacity4Rail aims of an affordable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway and the definitions of these terms defined in WP5.1.1. This (...)

The aim of this document is to provide background on the current technology assessment
methodologies and tools used in other rail related EU framework projects and by the wider industry.
It matches these existing assessment methodologies to the Capacity4Rail aims of an affordable,
automated, resilient and high capacity railway and the definitions of these terms defined in WP5.1.1.
This document also highlights areas of concern with the assessment of low technology readiness
level innovations to mature technologies and the issue of bias.

See the document
D52.3 Dataset of costs and RAMS data for analysis

- PDF - 1.1 Mb

The aim of this deliverable is to provide a compendium of baseline data that can be used for the cost benefit analysis which have to be carried out in WP5.4.
See the document
D53.1 Sites for migration

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This Deliverable presents the results of work done in Task 5.3.1. of the Capacity4Rail European Project. This document presents the objectives of the work which has been performed and also gives conclusions on how to choose real sites or corridors for presenting migration to the new railway system – infrastructure and operation, which is adaptable, automated, resilient and high-capacity. The (...)

This Deliverable presents the results of work done in Task 5.3.1. of the Capacity4Rail European Project. This document presents the objectives of the work which has been performed and also gives conclusions on how to choose real sites or corridors for presenting migration to the new railway system – infrastructure and operation, which is adaptable, automated, resilient and high-capacity.
The steps for migration to the future system have been considered in close relation to the European Strategy for transport “Roadmap to a single Transport Area – towards a competitive and resource efficient transport system”. The first step foreseen in the project is a presentation of corridors and sights around whole Europe, which can be chosen for testing solutions for the future railway system in Europe.
Different corridors and important points of the European Railway network are presented in this document.
Some corridors overlap, which provides more information on how a particular region of Europe is expected to develop in the future.
This document is an introduction to the process of migration to the future railway system in Europe.

See the document
D53.2 Migration scenarios and paths

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This deliverable presents a link between work packages WP5.1, WP5.2 and WP5.4, as well as bridging between the technical SPs (SP1, SP2, SP3 and SP4). This takes targets originally defined in D5.1.1 and looks at how they are applied to the C4R innovations, aims to understand the innovations as well as analyse the specific case study lines and routes and gather data on these to allow (...)

This deliverable presents a link between work packages WP5.1, WP5.2 and WP5.4, as well as bridging between the technical SPs (SP1, SP2, SP3 and SP4). This takes targets originally
defined in D5.1.1 and looks at how they are applied to the C4R innovations, aims to understand the innovations as well as analyse the specific case study lines and routes and gather data on these to allow innovations be applied specifically within WP5.4. Not all of the case study lines have been used in WP5.4, those that weren’t their analysis and baseline data is presented in this deliverable. However, for those that were used within WP5.4, the detailed data and final scenarios are presented as part of the cost benefit analysis within deliverable D5.4.2/3.

See the document
D53.3 Report on migration scenarios/paths for selected real sites/corridors

- PDF - 1.6 Mb

The objective of this deliverables is to describe and validate the migration paths with respect to the C4R innovations based on real RFCs. Due to complexity of the analysis carried out in WP5.3 and WP5.4 which are the input for this deliverable and the remaining time the migration was exemplary developed only for the slab track developed in (...)

The objective of this deliverables is to describe and validate the migration paths with respect to the
C4R innovations based on real RFCs.
Due to complexity of the analysis carried out in WP5.3 and WP5.4 which are the input for this
deliverable and the remaining time the migration was exemplary developed only for the slab track
developed in SP1.

See the document
D54.1 Integrated methodology for the analysis of scenarios and migration

- PDF - 3.7 Mb

This document reports on the work developed in Task 5.4.1, namely, the development of integrated methodologies for the analysis of technologies and scenarios. This task, within WP5.4, is highly intertwined with other Work Packages in SP5, namely, the definition of visions, requirements and boundaries to be made in WP5.1; the data collection and analysis templates to be developed in WP5.2 (...)

This document reports on the work developed in Task 5.4.1, namely, the development of integrated
methodologies for the analysis of technologies and scenarios.
This task, within WP5.4, is highly intertwined with other Work Packages in SP5, namely, the definition
of visions, requirements and boundaries to be made in WP5.1; the data collection and analysis
templates to be developed in WP5.2 and the scenarios and migrations to be established by WP5.3.
The present deliverable thus focuses on the assessment methodologies with respect to economic,
social, environmental and operational impacts. The current early version of this document aims to
establish these methodologies and encourage the inevitable interplay between WP5.4 and the other
WPs within SP5.

See the document
D54.2/3 Assessment of technologies, scenarios and impacts

- PDF - 6.1 Mb

This document is produced as part of Tasks 5.4.2 and 5.4.3 of the Capacity4Rail (C4R) project Sub Project (SP) 5. The assessment of technologies and scenarios and their ranking, immediately follow the work developed in Task 5.4.1 to develop the methodologies for this assessment.
See the document
D55.3 Report from Laboratory demonstrations

- PDF - 3.2 Mb

The main objectives of this WP55 – Demonstration, evaluation and assessment are: • To carry out test-scale demonstrations on infrastructure or in laboratories or demonstrations in virtual environment of the innovations proposed in the different subprojects. • To evaluate the technical results of the demonstrations. • To combine these results with the scenarios evaluation to perform a global (...)

The main objectives of this WP55 – Demonstration, evaluation and assessment are:
• To carry out test-scale demonstrations on infrastructure or in laboratories or demonstrations
in virtual environment of the innovations proposed in the different subprojects.
• To evaluate the technical results of the demonstrations.
• To combine these results with the scenarios evaluation to perform a global assessment of the
innovations proposed in the project.
• To perform safety and risk assessment for the demonstrators according to CSM.
This document 5.5.3 will describe the selected demonstrations performed in laboratories. The test
sites will be configured for each of the demonstrations according to the Test Plans

See the document
D55.4 Report from on-track demonstrations

- PDF - 3.9 Mb

This document D5.5.4 will describe the selected demonstrations performed on infrastructure. The test sites will be configured for each of the demonstrations according to the Test Plans
See the document
D55.5 Report from Virtual Demonstrations

- PDF - 1022.2 kb

This deliverable explains the work carried out as part of task 5.5.5. This task had the aim to: Demonstrate the impact of new technologies to perform in virtual-reality environments. This approach will visualize the capabilities of innovative technologies and methodologies that have initial-low TRLs but have the potential to enable step-changes and have a significant impact on the railway (...)

This deliverable explains the work carried out as part of task 5.5.5. This task had the aim to:
Demonstrate the impact of new technologies to perform in virtual-reality environments. This approach
will visualize the capabilities of innovative technologies and methodologies that have initial-low TRLs
but have the potential to enable step-changes and have a significant impact on the railway system.
During the project, we discussed and developed some potential concepts for such virtual reality tools
based upon user needs which are also described in this deliverable. However, the actual development
of the virtual reality tools was not carried out, as our analysis of the requirements indicated that there
was not a need for such a tool and most of the objectives could be achieved with existing tools or other
tools which are currently under development. The area in which SP5 could have created a new tool
would have been in creating an easy to use interface to the cost-benefit analysis work carried out
within WP5.4, however, due to the high level of customisation required for each innovation and case
study, the architecture of the tool would have had to have been reconsidered and was beyond the
scope of what was possible within the project.

See the document
D55.6 Final evaluation and assessment

- PDF - 2.2 Mb

The aim of this deliverable is to assess the results of the demonstrations to indicate the technical feasibility of the innovations. These results are combined with the assessments in SP5 (CBA) to provide final conclusions on the innovations proposed in the project.
See the document
D56.2 Guidelines for further research and development activities

- PDF - 1.8 Mb

The main objectives of this report are to: • Revisit the 2030 and 2050 targets for rail to confirm any changes (e.g. resetting of targets, introduction of new targets etc); • Contribution of C4R Innovations to achieving the targets; • High-level review of other progress in the rail sector that will help to meet the targets; • Report on progress in competitive sectors (e.g. automotive, (...)

The main objectives of this report are to:
• Revisit the 2030 and 2050 targets for rail to confirm any changes (e.g. resetting of targets,
introduction of new targets etc);
• Contribution of C4R Innovations to achieving the targets;
• High-level review of other progress in the rail sector that will help to meet the targets;
• Report on progress in competitive sectors (e.g. automotive, aerospace) in transport with
potential to impact on the achievement of the 2050 targets and vision for railways;
• Report on the gaps and identify next steps.

See the document

SP6 / WP61 - Dissemination, Exploitation and Training

Capacity4Rail to hold its 2nd dissemination event on 3 November 2016 in Brussels

Register online by filling the registration form below.

More information on the programme and the venue to be published soon!

Insert a valid email address (example: you@provider.com)


JPEG

Capacity4Rail Project showcased at InnoTrans 2016

The Capacity4Rail project will be showcased from 20 to 22 September 2016 at InnoTrans 2016 (Oltis Group, Hall 4.1, Stand 312 and University of Birmigham, Hall 7.1c, Stand 305).

Do not hesitate to visit the stands of OLTIS and University of Birmigham to learn more about the on-going research activities and attend live presentations of Capacity4Rail.

We look forward to seeing you at Stand 312 in Hall 4.1 or at Stand 305 in Hall 7.1c


TRA2016_link to official website

Capacity4Rail to be presented at TRA2016 in Warsaw (18-21 April 2016)

Capacity4Rail will be showcased at TRA 2016 on the UIC Stand.

Take this opportunity to discuss with project partners at the UIC stand in the Gallery Expo as indicated in the map below.

TRA2016_exhibition map_UIC stand

NB: The Early Bird registration rate expires on 15 February 2016. This means that you have just under one week to benefit from almost 40% off the full price!

Registration for the conference is open: https://www.conftool.pro/traconference/

For the conference programme please consult http://www.traconference.eu/programme/overall-programme/

We look forward to seeing you in Warsaw!


Capacity4Rail to hold its 3rd Plenary Meeting in UIC HQ on 27 October 2015

IMPORTANT

This meeting is exclusively reserved to the members of the Capacity4Rail consortium who are kindly requested to register by Tuesday 20 October 2015.


PNG - 87 kb


Save the date of 10 September 2015 for an interactive workshop in Brussels to help you to improve the supply chain with the Capacity4Rail Partners

You are keen to satisfy your final customers by providing them with the desired products at the lowest possible price. For that purpose you need the most efficient supply chain but at the same time you and your customers are conscious of the need to preserve the environment with a sustainable Supply Chain.

To achieve that goal Capacity4Rail is developing innovations in order to provide short term competitive solutions on a win-win basis. The results will be presented to you at the occasion of an interactive workshop on 10 September in Brussels.

Why you should be there?

New concepts have been elaborated and simulated but we need your advice to validate or amend them in an interactive workshop. Attending this workshop will allow you to ensure that your specific goals and needs are fully taken into account in the scope of the project.

Topics addressed:

• Available and updated information
• Better asset utilization
• More reliable wagon operation
• Increased usable length on a standard train
• Increased usable capacity of these new trains on the rail network
• Smoother transfer in terminals
• Significant cost reduction

Programme

Click on the icon below to download the programme.

cr4_freight_dissemination_workshop_agenda_v4.pdf

- PDF - 394.8 kb

See the document

Online registration

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Capacity4Rail held its first dissemination workshop on 10-11 June 2015, at UIC headquarters, in Paris

The Capacity4Rail project, co-funded by the European Commission, and addressing the issue of railway capacity, held its first dissemination workshop from 10 – 11 June in Paris.

This four-year project (1 October 2013 to 30 September 2017) aims to bring today’s railway system to a future vision for 2030/2050 where enhanced capacity and performances will enable it to successfully face the challenge of the growing demand for goods and passenger transportation. In particular, it will define a comprehensive roadmap to describe the necessary steps to develop and implement innovation and to progress from the current state-of-the-art to a shared global vision of the 2050 railway along realistic scenarios.

Attended by around 40 representatives from the railway sector, European bodies and academic institutions, the workshop served as an opportunity to promote the project’s objectives, take stock of the achievements to date and look towards future activities, as well as discuss the expected potential improvements from the project’s results.

The workshop was opened by Isabelle De Keyzer, followed by a general presentation by Laurent Schmitt, Project Coordinator at UIC. The presentations given by the researchers covered the various ways in which the project is addressing the capacity issue through its various sub-projects (infrastructure, freight, operations, advanced monitoring), giving an overview of the latest progress and developments within each area, and explained the objectives and strategy towards achieving a common vision for a more efficient future rail system.

Highlights of the workshop included:

  • Upgrading infrastructure
  • New concepts for freight systems
  • Operation for enhanced capacity
  • Developing advanced monitoring technology
  • Vision, roadmap and assessment framework

Presentations are available here:

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With 46 partners from 13 countries in Europe and Turkey, the consortium features a good balance between sector activities, and significant support from academies and universities.



The Capacity4Rail Consortium

Presentation of the project

CAPACITY4RAIL aims at paving the way for the future railway system, delivering coherent, demonstrated, innovative and sustainable solutions for:

  • Track design: transversal approach for infrastructure solutions for conventional mixed traffic and very high speed, integrated monitoring and power supply, reduced maintenance, new concept for highly reliable switches and crossings.
  • Freight: longer trains, lower tare loads, automatic coupling, enhanced braking, modern, automated, intelligent, fully integrated system for efficient, reliable and profitable freight operations
  • Operation and capacity: traffic capacity computation for freight and passenger, models and simulators for planners: capacity generation, traffic flow, resilience to perturbations, ability to recover from disturbance, computerised real time information to customers and operators at any time
  • Advanced monitoring: Integration of Advanced Monitoring Technologies in the design and building process, for a easier-to-monitor (self monitoring) infrastructure with low cost and low impact inspection

The full sustainability of the developed solutions and innovations will be assessed and scenarios for a smooth migration of the system from its current to its future state will be evaluated.